Willowbrook Polo Farms
“There is something about the outside of a horse that is good for the inside of a man.” - Winston Churchill
© Willow Brook Polo Farms 2019

News & History

History of the USPA

Dating back thousands of years to Central Asia, Polo is considered the oldest organized sport ever played and was first introduced in the United States by way of England in 1876. It didn’t take long for America to take a liking to this game of kings and assemble their own loosely structured matches. As players and teams propagated, the development of the sport demanded a governing body and in 1890 the United States Polo Association, or USPA (originally known as The Polo Association,) was formed. The second oldest governing body in the U.S. (behind only the United States Tennis Association (USTA,) the purpose of the USPA was to coordinate games, standardize rules, and establish handicaps so the teams could be more evenly matched. With new clubs rapidly emerging on the east coast, the original USPA headquarters was appropriately located in New York where the first formal U.S. club, the Westchester Polo Club, was established. The Association began operations on a voluntary basis of an elected committee structure and presently continues as such with a small office staff in the current epicenter of the sport just outside Wellington, FL. In its early days of regulation, the Association initiated changes in the number and length of time periods (chukkers) in a match, standardized equipment, mandated pony height and significantly improved their training, and instituted many prestigious tournaments still played today. As the sport gained in popularity and expanded geographically, circuits developed all across the country while Interscholastic and Intercollegiate (I/I) programs and indoor (arena) polo also came of age. lt. sharp of 16th field artillery shooting a goal 1926copyright by national photo company-1Throughout the twentieth century, excitement of the sport was contagious. During the World Wars era, USPA membership even included over 1,200 military players from the U.S. Army who were encouraged to participate in polo to improve their riding ability. Interest peaked all the way out to Hollywood in its heyday, dignitaries like President Theodore Roosevelt took up the game, the U.S. Open commenced at Oak Brook in Chicago, and the Indoor Polo Association combined with the USPA to expand the scope of the sport. Great strides were also made around this period as the overture of sponsor money for horses and professional players was introduced and international play increased. Dominate polo centers could now be found in Florida, Texas, and California and polo itself evolved from a society sport to include a far broader base of budget-minded horsemen, professional players, and commercial sponsorship. Today, USPA membership includes nearly 300 clubs in 13 different circuits across the United States and Canada and oversees 40 national tournaments. Supported by funding that comes from its officially licensed consumer brand, U.S. Polo Assn., the USPA tenaciously reinvests in numerous programs and services designed to grow and sustain the sport - particularly regarding the development of next generation American players. A key part of the sport’s evolution is the emergent inclusiveness and diversity of the polo community. In addition to the fast growth of young players, women now represent 40% of USPA membership, and the Gay Polo League is also recognized as a member club. The current USPA regime has made significant progress in the areas of umpiring, safety, rules, safety regulations, and refinement of the handicapping process while retaining many of the sport’s distinctive traditions. Polo has also begun to incorporate leading-edge technology as the level and amount of polo being played is the highest in the history of the game. As the official resource for the sport of polo in America, the USPA aims to provide a wide variety of resources to make the polo experience enjoyable for both participants and spectators while providing a solid foundation for the future of the sport. Lorem, et enim adipisicing proident dolore in non. Voluptate ut aliqua quis mollit dolore dolor anim consectetur dolor commodo est consequat sed ad reprehenderit! Aute officia dolore anim irure cillum sint do veniam. Labore exercitation quis minim adipisicing excepteur irure nulla occaecat id veniam voluptate anim ut magna sit tempor.

United States Polo Association

The United States Polo Association® was organized and exists for the

purposes of promoting the game of polo, coordinating the activities of its

Member Clubs and Registered Players, arranging and supervising polo

tournaments, competitions, and games and providing rules, handicaps,

and conditions for those tournaments, competitions, and games including

the safety and welfare of participants and mounts.

Founded in 1890, the United States Polo Association (USPA) is the national governing body for the sport of polo 1890 USPA Rule Book 1890 USPA Rule Book  in North America. Proudly celebrating 125 years at this stature, the USPA is currently comprised of almost 300 member clubs, thousands of individual members, and oversees 40 national tournaments. The level and amount of polo played today is the highest in the game’s history and as such, the USPA governs polo handicaps, tournament rules, equipment, and safety regulations in the U.S. and Canada to ensure the welfare and being of both pony and player. Funded by sales from the officially licensed consumer brand, U.S. Polo Assn., the USPA purposefully re-invests revenue by underwriting numerous development programs to expand and sustain the sport of polo.

Retired Racehorse Project

$100,000 THOROUGHBRED MAKEOVER ATTRACTS TOP TRAINERS FROM TEN SPORTS Retired Racehorse Project (RRP) released today a list of 480 trainers from 45 states, three Canadian Provinces and England who will acquire and train a recently retired racehorse for the $100,000 Thoroughbred Makeover and National Symposium, scheduled for October 27-30 at the Kentucky Horse Park. All ten of the discipline winners from last year’s Makeover will return to defend their titles, along with seventy-three other Makeover alumni on brand new horses. The remaining group of nearly 400 is doing this for the first time. This may be the most diverse group of accomplished horse trainers ever to gather in one place. Among the entries is a large contingent of professionals from the top ranks of their respective sports. It includes fifteen event riders who have competed at the advanced level, four grand prix dressage riders, and four grand prix show jumpers. The field hunter division features two past winners of the North American Field Hunter Championships, and among show hunters are ten who have trained winners at the country’s top A- circuit shows. The strong contingent of barrel racers will be eager to see what 20-time World Champion Lance Graves can do on a Thoroughbred, and the working ranch division mixes lifelong ranch hands with a half-dozen show and rodeo veterans wearing World Champion belt buckles. At least six of the polo trainers make their livings training and selling to the world’s top players, and the Competitive Trails division is an eclectic mix of endurance riders, Extreme Cowboy Race veterans, and all manner of trail and obstacle class winners. And then there is the crowd-favorite freestyle division. It features 14 Mustang Makeover alumni, Road to the Horse trainers, a National Cavalry Champion in mounted pistols and saber, an AQHA World Champion driver, and the entertainment director of Arabian Nights Theater. “Reading through the applications of these 480 trainers was like opening Christmas presents,” said RRP President Steuart Pittman. “Off-track Thoroughbreds dominated the horse show world in this country when they were in the barns of our very best riders and trainers. We believe that a key to restoring demand for these horses is matching some of them with the best trainers. Doing so not only increases their chances of winning, but it iencourages those trainers’ clients and fans to consider an off-track Thoroughbred. “With the carrot of $100,000 in prize money, lots of promotion, and a buzz among the horse industry too loud to ignore, we have recruited trainers who are leaders in their sports. Many of these trainers have barns full of warmbloods and Quarter Horses. Some grew up on Thoroughbreds and feel like this is coming home. Others are trying something completely new. Lindsey Partridge won Competitive Trails and the overall title of America’s Most Wanted Thoroughbred last year with her grey mare Soar. When asked how she felt about the flood of top trainers coming to challenge her title, she said without hesitation, “I think it’s fantastic! It means more Thoroughbreds are going to be rehomed and showcased to their full potential.” That is the spirit that makes this competition unique. It truly is about the horses, and that shared commitment is felt throughout the barns and all the arenas. It is an even playing field for amateurs, pros, and juniors, and money can’t buy success. With $100,000 and major bragging rights on the line, the Makeover does push trainers to do their very best work. Lindsey’s closing remark was, “I will be upping my game this year.” We suspect she speaks for many.

Darlington Polo Club  

Game Information

Please check the HOTLINE for information on game day. Unsafe field conditions and team cancellations do happen. We do not want to inconvenience you and have you make a trip to the field if we are not playing. Polo Hot Line : 330-692-0851

Darlington Polo Club - History

The Darlington Polo Club is in its 79th consecutive season. The Club began playing in the summer of 1937 when Cliff Braden and other interested fans retrieved a ball from under a car at a game in Zelienople. They began playing the sport in Darlington in a very primitive fashion. Their mounts were plow horses. They used gasoline cans for goal posts and lit the field with a series of floodlights hung from the surrounding trees. The founders of the club would be surprised at the advancements the club has made since it humble beginnings. In recent years, the club has purchased a lighting system that was used to light the local high school football stadium. Most players ride athletic Thoroughbreds with a few preferring the Quarter Horse and Appaloosa Breeds. Quickness and agility are the most sought after traits in a polo horse. The Darlington Polo Clubs home season begins in mid May and runs to the end of August. We play our home games at 8:00 P.M. on Friday nights earning the team the name " Night Riders". We play competitive teams from Canada, Ohio, Michigan, New York, and Virginia. Many of today's high goal professional players have graced the Darlington field early in their careers. The atmosphere at a Friday night game is a mix of hometown sports and backyard festival with a healthy dose of horse and family thrown in for good measure. The local Lion's Club serves up French fries, funnel cakes and other ballpark treats from their concession stand. Most of the players' families are pressed into service as ticket takers, referees, and grooms. Friends and families turn out with lawn chairs and picnic baskets to cheer for the home team. The Darlington Polo Club would like to invite you and your family to come and join us each Friday for polo "under the lights."
Willowbrook Polo Farms
“There is something about the outside of a horse that is good for the inside of a man.” - Winston Churchhill
© Willow Brook Polo Farms 2019

News & History

History of the USPA

Dating back thousands of years to Central Asia, Polo is considered the oldest organized sport ever played and was first introduced in the United States by way of England in 1876. It didn’t take long for America to take a liking to this game of kings and assemble their own loosely structured matches. As players and teams propagated, the development of the sport demanded a governing body and in 1890 the United States Polo Association, or USPA (originally known as The Polo Association,) was formed. The second oldest governing body in the U.S. (behind only the United States Tennis Association (USTA,) the purpose of the USPA was to coordinate games, standardize rules, and establish handicaps so the teams could be more evenly matched. With new clubs rapidly emerging on the east coast, the original USPA headquarters was appropriately located in New York where the first formal U.S. club, the Westchester Polo Club, was established. The Association began operations on a voluntary basis of an elected committee structure and presently continues as such with a small office staff in the current epicenter of the sport just outside Wellington, FL. In its early days of regulation, the Association initiated changes in the number and length of time periods (chukkers) in a match, standardized equipment, mandated pony height and significantly improved their training, and instituted many prestigious tournaments still played today. As the sport gained in popularity and expanded geographically, circuits developed all across the country while Interscholastic and Intercollegiate (I/I) programs and indoor (arena) polo also came of age. lt. sharp of 16th field artillery shooting a goal 1926copyright by national photo company-1Throughout the twentieth century, excitement of the sport was contagious. During the World Wars era, USPA membership even included over 1,200 military players from the U.S. Army who were encouraged to participate in polo to improve their riding ability. Interest peaked all the way out to Hollywood in its heyday, dignitaries like President Theodore Roosevelt took up the game, the U.S. Open commenced at Oak Brook in Chicago, and the Indoor Polo Association combined with the USPA to expand the scope of the sport. Great strides were also made around this period as the overture of sponsor money for horses and professional players was introduced and international play increased. Dominate polo centers could now be found in Florida, Texas, and California and polo itself evolved from a society sport to include a far broader base of budget-minded horsemen, professional players, and commercial sponsorship. Today, USPA membership includes nearly 300 clubs in 13 different circuits across the United States and Canada and oversees 40 national tournaments. Supported by funding that comes from its officially licensed consumer brand, U.S. Polo Assn., the USPA tenaciously reinvests in numerous programs and services designed to grow and sustain the sport - particularly regarding the development of next generation American players. A key part of the sport’s evolution is the emergent inclusiveness and diversity of the polo community. In addition to the fast growth of young players, women now represent 40% of USPA membership, and the Gay Polo League is also recognized as a member club. The current USPA regime has made significant progress in the areas of umpiring, safety, rules, safety regulations, and refinement of the handicapping process while retaining many of the sport’s distinctive traditions. Polo has also begun to incorporate leading-edge technology as the level and amount of polo being played is the highest in the history of the game. As the official resource for the sport of polo in America, the USPA aims to provide a wide variety of resources to make the polo experience enjoyable for both participants and spectators while providing a solid foundation for the future of the sport. Lorem, et enim adipisicing proident dolore in non. Voluptate ut aliqua quis mollit dolore dolor anim consectetur dolor commodo est consequat sed ad reprehenderit! Aute officia dolore anim irure cillum sint do veniam. Labore exercitation quis minim adipisicing excepteur irure nulla occaecat id veniam voluptate anim ut magna sit tempor.

United States Polo Association

The United States Polo Association® was organized and exists for the

purposes of promoting the game of polo, coordinating the activities of its

Member Clubs and Registered Players, arranging and supervising polo

tournaments, competitions, and games and providing rules, handicaps,

and conditions for those tournaments, competitions, and games including

the safety and welfare of participants and mounts.

Founded in 1890, the United States Polo Association (USPA) is the national governing body for the sport of polo 1890 USPA Rule Book 1890 USPA Rule Book  in North America. Proudly celebrating 125 years at this stature, the USPA is currently comprised of almost 300 member clubs, thousands of individual members, and oversees 40 national tournaments. The level and amount of polo played today is the highest in the game’s history and as such, the USPA governs polo handicaps, tournament rules, equipment, and safety regulations in the U.S. and Canada to ensure the welfare and being of both pony and player. Funded by sales from the officially licensed consumer brand, U.S. Polo Assn., the USPA purposefully re-invests revenue by underwriting numerous development programs to expand and sustain the sport of polo.

Retired Racehorse Project

$100,000 THOROUGHBRED MAKEOVER ATTRACTS TOP TRAINERS FROM TEN SPORTS Retired Racehorse Project (RRP) released today a list of 480 trainers from 45 states, three Canadian Provinces and England who will acquire and train a recently retired racehorse for the $100,000 Thoroughbred Makeover and National Symposium, scheduled for October 27-30 at the Kentucky Horse Park. All ten of the discipline winners from last year’s Makeover will return to defend their titles, along with seventy-three other Makeover alumni on brand new horses. The remaining group of nearly 400 is doing this for the first time. This may be the most diverse group of accomplished horse trainers ever to gather in one place. Among the entries is a large contingent of professionals from the top ranks of their respective sports. It includes fifteen event riders who have competed at the advanced level, four grand prix dressage riders, and four grand prix show jumpers. The field hunter division features two past winners of the North American Field Hunter Championships, and among show hunters are ten who have trained winners at the country’s top A- circuit shows. The strong contingent of barrel racers will be eager to see what 20-time World Champion Lance Graves can do on a Thoroughbred, and the working ranch division mixes lifelong ranch hands with a half-dozen show and rodeo veterans wearing World Champion belt buckles. At least six of the polo trainers make their livings training and selling to the world’s top players, and the Competitive Trails division is an eclectic mix of endurance riders, Extreme Cowboy Race veterans, and all manner of trail and obstacle class winners. And then there is the crowd-favorite freestyle division. It features 14 Mustang Makeover alumni, Road to the Horse trainers, a National Cavalry Champion in mounted pistols and saber, an AQHA World Champion driver, and the entertainment director of Arabian Nights Theater. “Reading through the applications of these 480 trainers was like opening Christmas presents,” said RRP President Steuart Pittman. “Off-track Thoroughbreds dominated the horse show world in this country when they were in the barns of our very best riders and trainers. We believe that a key to restoring demand for these horses is matching some of them with the best trainers. Doing so not only increases their chances of winning, but it iencourages those trainers’ clients and fans to consider an off-track Thoroughbred. “With the carrot of $100,000 in prize money, lots of promotion, and a buzz among the horse industry too loud to ignore, we have recruited trainers who are leaders in their sports. Many of these trainers have barns full of warmbloods and Quarter Horses. Some grew up on Thoroughbreds and feel like this is coming home. Others are trying something completely new. Lindsey Partridge won Competitive Trails and the overall title of America’s Most Wanted Thoroughbred last year with her grey mare Soar. When asked how she felt about the flood of top trainers coming to challenge her title, she said without hesitation, “I think it’s fantastic! It means more Thoroughbreds are going to be rehomed and showcased to their full potential.” That is the spirit that makes this competition unique. It truly is about the horses, and that shared commitment is felt throughout the barns and all the arenas. It is an even playing field for amateurs, pros, and juniors, and money can’t buy success. With $100,000 and major bragging rights on the line, the Makeover does push trainers to do their very best work. Lindsey’s closing remark was, “I will be upping my game this year.” We suspect she speaks for many.

Darlington Polo Club - History

The Darlington Polo Club is in its 79th consecutive season. The Club began playing in the summer of 1937 when Cliff Braden and other interested fans retrieved a ball from under a car at a game in Zelienople. They began playing the sport in Darlington in a very primitive fashion. Their mounts were plow horses. They used gasoline cans for goal posts and lit the field with a series of floodlights hung from the surrounding trees. The founders of the club would be surprised at the advancements the club has made since it humble beginnings. In recent years, the club has purchased a lighting system that was used to light the local high school football stadium. Most players ride athletic Thoroughbreds with a few preferring the Quarter Horse and Appaloosa Breeds. Quickness and agility are the most sought after traits in a polo horse. The Darlington Polo Clubs home season begins in mid May and runs to the end of August. We play our home games at 8:00 P.M. on Friday nights earning the team the name " Night Riders". We play competitive teams from Canada, Ohio, Michigan, New York, and Virginia. Many of today's high goal professional players have graced the Darlington field early in their careers. The atmosphere at a Friday night game is a mix of hometown sports and backyard festival with a healthy dose of horse and family thrown in for good measure. The local Lion's Club serves up French fries, funnel cakes and other ballpark treats from their concession stand. Most of the players' families are pressed into service as ticket takers, referees, and grooms. Friends and families turn out with lawn chairs and picnic baskets to cheer for the home team. The Darlington Polo Club would like to invite you and your family to come and join us each Friday for polo "under the lights."